WTF is a Purpler?

Purpler

(noun)


Someone who is highly knowledgeable about a topic and informs others about it through text messaging. Someone who cares more about creating value for their audience than generating clicks and eyeballs. Someone who wants to create a better-informed society.



When someone subscribes to your Purple channel they are inviting you into the most precious space in their phone. They’re literally giving you their phone number and permission to text them whenever you want.

With great power comes great responsibility.

Take all of the stuff you think you know about media and throw it out the window. This isn’t about scale. This isn’t about quantity. This is about providing a valuable service to a group of people who really want to hear what you have to say.

Our platform gives you the ability to text with your audience in almost the same way that you interact with your friends. You can send one-to-many text messages and easily manage one-to-one conversations with members who text you back (if you want to).

Think about how cool this is. You can actually speak to your audience like a human being! Which, in our experience, they really like!

Even cooler: this allows you to focus on the quality of your work rather than the quantity. No trying to churn out as many 800-word pieces as you can for clicks. No tweeting and facebook-posting as fast as your fingers will carry your words, fighting through the noise.

Each text message will be opened and read by 99% of your members. Each of whom is paying you monthly recurring revenue. You’re building a strong community that trusts you. In a world where trust in media is at an all time low, we don’t need to tell you how powerful that is.


Types of Purplers

The Curator


Rebecca here 👋. I’m the cofounder and CEO of Purple. I’m a big politics nerd. When the 2016 election started ramping up, I would get text messages all the time from friends about politics. What should they read about Ted Cruz? What should they keep an eye out for in tonight’s debate? What the hell is going on in Syria?

So my Purple channel became all about curating the most important information on politics for my members. I would try to distill it down to make it super easy to digest, and show people why they should care. I’d send maybe 1-2 texts per day, 5 days a week.

This turned out to be super valuable to a lot of people. The more I engaged with them as a real human, the more they trusted me. And something super cool started happening.

Because I became my member’s go-to source to talk/learn about politics, they started sending me content and questions that I would then share with the rest of my members. My channel naturally evolved into an incredibly engaged contributor network.

This is one type of Purpler, and the cool thing is, you don’t have to be a professional content creator to be great at this! You just have to be genuinely interested in a topic and care deeply about informing others about it.

Example of a curator: Kendall Baker


The Industry Expert


There are a lot of people out there with high value information just sitting in their heads. Academics. Researchers. Experienced professionals in a given field.

Starting a Purple channel is a great way to monetize that information just sitting in your head.

Other things you can do that are powerful: Pictures. If you’re traveling, send a selfie from the airport! If you’re reading a book and want to tell your members about it, tFocusing your channel on something niche is key here. Could be healthcare reform. Could be artificial intelligence. Could be voice user interfaces.

You can text your paying members exclusive insights. Answer crowd-sourced questions. And highlight important updates on your field.

Example of an industry expert: Matt Hartman


The Brand With a Voice


The Hustle. The Skimm. Barstool. What do people love about these brands? They have very distinct, human voices. They don’t feel like faceless sources. They feel more like people.

Nothing feels more human and personal than text messaging.

Send texts with pictures from inside the newsroom or out in the field. Add a face and a name to your reporters and give your super fans a look behind the scenes of how you put together a story.

Example of a brand with a voice: Joany



Home